How long does Xanax stay in your system? | Online Meds Guru
November 24, 2021 By PRAVIND VERMA 0

How Long Does Xanax Stay in Your System?

What is Xanax?

Generic Name: Alprazolam

Brand Name: Xanax

Xanax is a prescripted medication used to treat the symptoms of anxiety, panic disorders, and stress associated with depression; therefore, it belongs with the drug called antianxiety agents and benzodiazepines, a prescribed medication that is used to cure anxiety, depression, or panic disorders and works to balance out the chemicals in our brain that enhances the neurotransmitters in the brain that can help a person become relaxed, calm and feeling better; therefore, it is very safe and effective when if a person takes it correctly.

Uses for Xanax

Xanax provides calmness to the nerves and produces a feeling of relaxation at usual doses, which come in pill form. The prescription use of Xanax is to treat panic attacks and anxiety disorders that can occur unexpectedly or during particular situations such as driving or flying and are described as:

  • Restlessness
  • Trembling
  • Sweating
  • Clammy hands
  • Insomnia
  • Difficulty concentrating

How Long Does Xanax Stay in Your System?

Xanax is a prescribed medication used to treat anxiety and panic disorder; therefore, one dose of Xanax lasts anywhere from 31 hours to 13.5 hours in the body, determining factors associated with the individual who took it. In contrast, Xanax takes 11 hours for the healthy person to eradicate half of the dose of Xanax. 

Xanax takes full effects in less than 2 hours in some cases. It is considered a fast-acting benzodiazepine; as it peaks, the body and brain effects of Xanax include:-weakness, fatigue, unsteadiness, dizziness, sedation. So whenever Xanax enters a person’s body, it is transported through the body and processed in the liver. The liver that metabolizes Xanax into two primary metabolites are hydroxyalprazolam I and hydroxyalprazolam II.

Therefore, many factors determine how long Xanax stays in your system. Here’s a general study of how the detection of Xanax in your urine, blood, saliva, and hair follicles can be done which include;

Hair test: Xanax can be detected in the hair follicles between 2-3 weeks after using the drug for up to 90 days.

Saliva test: saliva test can detect Xanax for 2.5 days after taking your last dose as some study has shown that oral testing may soon become the most common way to test for Xanax.

Blood tests: blood tests are generally used in the medical field for emergencies and have a brief detection window; therefore, Xanax can stay in your blood for approximately 24 hours.

Urine test: The urine test is a commonly used test with high accuracy and simplicity that usually shows results from 1 to 3 days. For older people or those with a slow metabolism, the vision window may be too long.

How long does it take for Xanax to work?

Xanax is a powerful drug, and it starts at different doses for everyone. Still, unless a person is tolerant of the drug or is taking the wrong amount, it usually begins within 15 minutes to an hour. The human body absorbs Xanax very quickly into the bloodstream and is absorbed by the brain just minutes after a person takes it; therefore, most of the effects were visible in 90 percent during the first hours.

If the drug does not work, there are two significant possibilities. In both cases, there may be an issue of substance abuse:

1-You may have taken an incorrect dose. Doctors prescribe the proper effective doses, and not taking the correct amount can cause some problems.

2- You may have developed a tolerance to the drug. This could be from abiding abuse of Xanax or similar medicines that affect the same brain parts. This could be other benzodiazepines or drugs like alcohol.

What does Xanax feel like?

Xanax is a depressant that makes people feel a calming effect by slowing down the processes in the body. It is a prescripted medication that can reduce anxiety and help people with debilitating panic disorders lead a normal lifestyle.

Subsequently, after taking Xanax for a long time, the body becomes accustomed to the substance, so a person may experience withdrawal symptoms when he stops. Reducing Xanax slightly over time reduces the severity of these symptoms.